Holiday Framing

Everyone has those prized images from their past or beautiful images of their children or grandchildren. You've got to do them justice and get those memories framed. Framed images make great presents for the holiday season or any other time of year. We here at Panopticon have a huge range of custom and ready made frames for your treasured images.

When you come in to the shop, our staff will be there to work with you through all of the steps of framing an image. First we will help you pick out a frame and mat color and shape that suits your image. Then we will discuss mounting and glass options. Our job is to make sure you love whatever display we come up with. We also work within your budget to make your image look the best that it can without breaking the bank.

Digital Restorations: A gift of a Memory

The holidays are coming up, why not give a one of a kind gift? Really personal and special gifts are difficult to figure out. Imagine what it would be like to give a loved one back a fully digitally restored image. Here at Panopticon Imaging, we can take your old, damaged, or otherwise original images and make fully restored digital copies at almost any size you would like. Not only that, but we can create a beautiful custom framing job for a complete holiday package. Memories may fade, but your photos don't have to.

The process of restoring an image begins with the original. From there, we make a high resolution scan that we then bring into Photoshop and edit until the restoration is complete. Then we make an archival print (or many prints) for you and your family or friends to look at and enjoy for the years to come.

Choosing the Right digital Paper for You

Last year, we came out with a blog post about the different digital papers that you can read HERE. Now, we are going to go a little more in depth on the most popular papers that we use and what they are used for so you can decide which works best for your images.

Matte Papers:

Epson hot press natural:

Hot Press Natural is a matte paper that we use very often here at Panopticon. It is a cotton rag paper with a smooth finish. Because it does not contain added brighteners, the paper has a warmer, natural tone rather than a bright white.

This paper is good for warmer black and white or sepia toned images. Colors are slightly less vibrant and more natural which holds up over time. Hot Press Natural has a wider tonal range than some other matte papers that we have come across.

 

 

 

Canson_Rag_Photographique.png

Canson Rag Photographique:

With Canson Rag Photographique there are two weights: 210gsm and 310gsm. If you are looking for a fine art exhibition print, make sure you get the 310gsm. The lower weight paper is great for test prints. This is a bright white cotton rag paper that is also archival. The smooth surface is quick drying and has a higher water resistance than other papers to protect the image from damage.

Rag Photographique holds color very well and is great for making vibrant matte prints. If your image has a lot of blues, this is the paper for you because it holds a wide range of blue tones.

 

 

Glossy papers:

Canson Platine fibre rag:

Platine is a cotton rag paper with a smooth, lustrous surface. Sometimes, the paper flakes at the edges when cut, but if you use a fresh blade, there should not be any problems. This true bright white paper does not contain any brighteners that can affect the longevity of the image. Because Platine is a luster paper, the blacks maintain much of their detail from screen to print.

Platine is great for both color and black and white images that don't call for a very glossy paper, but want some vibrancy and life.

 

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Canson Baryta:

Baryta is very much like Platine in its level of gloss, but has more stiffness. It is another smooth cotton rag paper but it has a slightly warmer tone than Platine. This paper has great sharpness and has great density in the blacks. Baryta has a slight amount of brightener that makes it 99.1% white. It also dries very quickly and has a high water resistance to protect from damage.

Baryta is great for almost everything. It has the same finish as silver gelatin fibre paper so blacks look great and colors have a wide tonal range.

Diana Back to School Give Away!

INSTAGRAM GIVEAWAY TIME!!!

 

With September just 2 weeks away (I know right?) we here at Panopticon Imaging have decided to celebrate the end of Summer and Back to School !

How you ask? Well we have a sweet Diana F Camera with all the trimmings we are giving away ON INSTAGRAM, along with 2 rolls of film (Ilford HP5 120) with Developing and Contacts included. Plus a Sticker pack! The Diana F has been customized in Panopti Red because we can’t have anything stock. It comes with a flash and the adapters so that the flash can be used on other cameras along with a pretty cool book on the history of the Diana camera.

CHECK IT OUT HERE!

Don’t know what a Diana is?

Here’s a link to the Lomography site about the newer ones

https://microsites.lomography.com/diana/

And the Wikipedia link has some more info on the camera and it's history.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diana_(camera)

 

Armed with that knowledge and still willing to take the plunge?

 

Embrace the imperfection of analog and happy accidents! Remember it’s not the camera it's the artist wielding it. Don’t worry about the cost of processing because the first 2 rolls are on us! Shoot the first roll, send it  to us we will develop and contact free of charge. Like what you see? Want to change something? Explore an idea that came to you? Load that second roll and have at it! Send it back to us we will develop and contact free of charge as well.

 

Photo ByBruce R. Wahl

Photo ByBruce R. Wahl

CONTEST RULES:

  • Open to currently enrolled undergraduate Students.

  • Like and tag a friend plus your school on the official contest post on instagram to enter.

  • Winner will need to provide a copy of current class schedule to collect the loot.

  • We will most likely post some of your images at a future date.

 

Flying with Film

Mr Whiskey Photo assistant and packing consultant extrodinaire 

Mr Whiskey Photo assistant and packing consultant extrodinaire 

So with my upcoming trip out to Anderson Ranch I realized I was going to be flying with a bunch of film. Normally I prefer to drive places so I can make photos along the way. The Journey being as important as The Destination. This go around I’m a bit time bankrupt and the distance is great enough to warrant a flight. This brings into play a whole set of variables.You see with a 2002 Crown Victoria I can fit an amazing amount of stuff. But right now I’m limited to a carry on in the overhead and one that will fit under the seat of the plane….

So some choices have to be made.

First off I’m bringing the Canon 5dmk3 for ease of use and instant feedback during the workshop. 3 lenses 3 batteries 4 sets of cards and a flash round out that kit. I know a zoom takes up less room than 3 primes. It’s just that I don’t work that way. Primes just fit my way of working. My second choice is the tried and true Mamiya 7II with a 65mm and a 80mm.

I chose this camera because it makes roughly the same aspect ratio as my 4x5.It has a leaf shutter for faster flash sync speeds and it has a much smaller profile.That and a few odds and ends round out my back pack bag..

Why the added expense and hassle of working with film? That’s a much longer post for a different time.

So now that I’m mostly packed I need to worry about 2 other essential items.

A tripod and some film. The tripod is the easy one, I’m going to use a smaller one with a ball head and stuff it in my suitcase.I won’t have as much room for underwear and socks but there is laundry available where I’m going so that should be fine.If I wanted one of the bigger ones for use with a bigger camera I could always ship it to my destination and ship it back when done but that’s just not practical right now.

Now onto the 2nd and biggest essential.

FILM. In particular Kodak Portra 400 120.

Freezer bag with label and some emulsion choices.

Freezer bag with label and some emulsion choices.

After some online research, to see if anything has changed in the last few years. Not much has. Kodak tells us that film rated at 800iso is fine for one pass through the current X-ray machines. That means 400iso is good for 2, 160iso for 3.Maybe. That information only applies to the personal screening machines, checked bags get a WAY BIGGER dose of X-rays. Never and I mean NEVER put film in a checked bag. As an aside,never travel with film loaded in a camera, remember the camera is going to be X-rayed, also there is a chance that the film back might be opened by a screener, and there goes your film…

There are no direct flights from Boston to Aspen I’m going to be making a couple of hops. If worse comes to worst my film will get the Zap two times. Not the end of the world but not ideal and I’m not cool with that. I’m going through all the trouble to work with film I don't want it damaged. Fortune favors the prepared!

What I need to do is put all my unexposed rolls in a clear plastic freezer bag that is marked “unexposed film” and ask to have it hand checked. Nicely and with the confidence that this is how it’s done. Because this is how we travel by air with film. I shouldn’t have to tell you that you should be nice,like me Ma always said, “be nice on purpose.”

Do not use the old shielded bags they used to use for film. If an X-ray screener can't see through them they just turn up the power until they can, effectively rendering them useless.The reason I like the freezer bag is they are tougher then sandwich bags, they have a hardier zipper and they also usually have a little panel you can write on with a sharpie.I label almost everything, it makes finding things in a hurry easier. A well labeled bag that is easily accessible saves the screener time. I don’t know about you but when I run into an organized and prepared person at work I’m more then willing to go out of my way to help them out. They took the time to think about my time and its value. Be that person

Everything you need plus somethings you don't! but you'll need it if you don't bring it.

Everything you need plus somethings you don't! but you'll need it if you don't bring it.

That brings me to getting to the airport early. Being respectful of other people’s time and allowing yourself enough time to deal with being a special case is important. Worse case you just make your flight, best case you have extra time to buy an overpriced beer while waiting for that flight.

Lastly mark your exposed rolls and keep them in a separate freezer bag. Still easily accessible along with the unexposed rolls just separate. I had to compromise with a screener once where they hand inspected my exposed film and xrayed the unexposed. Yup it came down to that. Exposed film is more sensitive so it was more important to me,the unexposed got marked and then used in the holga because that’s my happy accident camera, I’m already throwing the dice so why not a little more chance?

So clear plastic bag, labeled and readily accessible. Smile, be polite and GET THERE EARLY. Make sense? I hope so,here is a handy link to the tech Support articles from Kodak.

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/Support/Technical_Information/Transportation/index.htm

One from Fujifilmusa

http://www.fujifilmusa.com/support/ServiceSupportProductContent.do?dbid=670359&prodcat=238119&sscucatid=664277

And one from Ilford.

https://www.ilfordphoto.com/faqs

Elizabeth Ellenwood: Darkroom Printer, Photographer & Friend

Photographer: Bruce R. Wahl

Photographer: Bruce R. Wahl

Elizabeth “Liz” Ellenwood will be leaving Panopticon Imaging to pursue her Master’s Degree in Photography at the University of Connecticut! We are so very proud of her and her decision to go back to school.  Sadly, she will be leaving Panopticon on July 8th to move and get settled in her new home. We hope that you have time to stop by or give her a call and wish her luck. 

We wanted to share some of the wonderful times we’ve had over the years. Liz has been an integral part of Panopticon Imaging since 2012. She met Paul while interning at Panopticon Gallery. Shortly thereafter she started working one day a week and eventually became a full time staff member. Her first project was working with Paul in the darkroom printing Harold Feinstein. Liz loved working directly with photographer Tony King both in Massachusetts and his home in Maine. Not to forget the darkroom and digital clients whom she shared her insight with over the years (I could go on for a very long time). She represented Panopticon at Filter Photo Festival and the local and national Society for Photographic Education conferences. Also, we were able to share in her photographic milestones of solo exhibitions: “Of light and Line” at Danforth Art and “These Times and Shapes” at Sharon Arts Center Gallery.

Liz is always more than happy to pitch in and is a great source of joy for us here. Most notably she became known for being easy “spooked” by Nick, Chris, and Bruce. It would happen so often there are two compilations of the spookenings.  Liz also never turned down trying to fit in the various shipping boxes that would arrive in the office and it became a fun game.

But in all seriousness WE LOVE YOU SO VERY MUCH! Enjoy grad school and we know some good printer & framers in case you need help (wink wink). We truly wish you the best Liz and hope this doesn’t make you cry too much.

With all our love,

Paul, Patty, Brandon, Bruce, Chris, Elena, Nick, Sloane and Shannon

The common file formats


JPEG

JPEG stands for Joint Photographic Experts Group and is named after the committee that created it in 1986.

It is not as sharp out of the camera as TIFF or RAW modes, and every time the JPEG is manipulated more than once or twice, it will eventually become unusable. Every time the JPEG image is modified and resaved, it will lose more data.

Once compressed in JPEG format an image cannot be uncompressed (you cannot regain the original quality). This is why the original photo (your digital negative) should be taken with as little compression as possible.

When to use:

-       emailing

-       posting to the web

When NOT to use:

-       Printing (while we can use jpeg files for printing we would prefer a larger file in the form of a tiff or PSD, if the jpeg is compressed to heavily we do not recommend printing with it at all)


TIFF

TIFF stands for Tag Image File Format.

Tifs have a high image quality and is supported by many image-manipulation programs such as PhotoShop, Pagemaker, QuarkXPress, Adobe InDesign, Paint Shop Pro, etc.  You can have layers in photoshop when you safe with a tif and it can be modified and resaved, with the images being used an endless number of times without throwing away any image data.

When to use:

-       Printing

-       Editing in programs

-       Saving master files

-       Publishing

When NOT to use:

-       Emailing

-       Posting to web


RAW

The RAW mode is a picture format where the camera has made absolutely no changes; the files are not yet processed or ready to use with an editor, etc.

Its advantages are that a huge amount of control over the final look of the image is yours. Additionally, all original details stays in the image for any and all future processing needs.

The general rule is to shoot your images with the highest setting that your camera will allow (largest image size in terms of pixels, lowest compression – usually large/superfine).

When to use:

-       While shooting

When NOT to use:

-       Emailing

-       Posting to web


Artist Spotlight: Phillip Jones

We have been lucky to work with Phillip Jones for the past few years. His experience of photography has been growing since he was young with his father being a professional cinematographer. An avid film lover, Phillip primarily shoots medium format black and white film and creates traditional darkroom prints.  While his subject matter ranges from each location he photographs, his rich tonal range stays the same. One thing is for sure, he has a style that is known and admired by many and it was great to get to know a little more about his process.

  • How did you become interested in photography? Was it something you grew up with?

PJ: Yes, photography was always there. My father was a professional cinematographer, filming documentaries out of Washington, DC. He also did still work and was so busy that the best way to see him was visit the darkroom or tag along on his photo shoots.

He landed a dream project filming the Cape Cod National Seashore for its new visitor center. If you ever wondered who made those films in visitor centers, it was dad.

The whole family stayed at a rental cottage on the Great Pond, in Easton, while he worked on the production. After about four days I was getting bored as only a 13-year-old can.

Dad fished an Olympus Pen-F camera out of his bag. Sleek and silver, it exposed 72 half-frame shots onto a 35mm roll of film. He said that I could have just one roll for the vacation and not to drop it into the pond. He'd develop it when we got back home, then we'd go over what I'd come up with.

So, my first roll of film was shot on a dare from my father, a master photographer.

At first, it was hard to commit to actually snapping the shutter, but just wandering around with my photo-radar jacked up changed everything.

It all seems quaint now, most children have taken thousands of iPhone photos before they're ten.

  •   Walk us through your shooting process – do you scout each place for the perfect time of day or is it more spontaneous where you walk around and see what inspires you?

PJ: When traveling somewhere special, with limited time or if a return trip is unlikely, it often takes longer doing the research than being there.

I study guide books, topographical atlases, Google Earth, Panoramio, "Things to Do" in Trip Advisor, Flickr, Pinterest and Google Images for a start. Then delve deeper into the more interesting locations and, by the flight, have a folder of images, maps, and GPS coordinates.

These are the "official destinations" for the trip, but serve more as back-ups if the free-form exploration fails. I try to be observant and not agenda driven. It's always seemed presumptuous to decide what to photograph first rather than consider incidental subjects as they're encountered.

It's easy to become complacent when working on home turf, feeling like Boston's given up all it's secrets. Then you remember that the city's still evolving and you've just been stuck on the same ant trails. I often check for the transitions of earlier photo sites to get warmed up. 

Most American cities are somewhat readable. There's often a river with a historical downtown that people are trying to revitalize. Downstream has industrial and utilitarian structures. Nicer residences are upstream or uphill, things like that.

It's that not difficult to sniff out regions that are pregnant with visual possibilities, but I can't really explain how someone knows that it's time to set up the gear. Guess you've got to be there.

  • You split your time between Atlanta, Boston, and traveling. Does one city inspire you to create your images more than the other? 

PJ: Other photographers have published excellent work on Atlanta, Mark Steinmetz for one. And as much as I love aspects of Atlanta, it's aesthetic of sprawling sameness doesn't jibe with the visual depth that I'm looking for. "The South", on the other hand, is a goldmine for subject matter. Birmingham, Macon, Mobile, Richmond and Savannah have yet to be completely retrofitted.

Boston is special, visually. It's like Philadelphia and Baltimore; important East Coast cities since colonial times. They've had robust industrial periods and are centers of international trade. In other words, they've had an accretion of character over generations that contrasts with their post-industrial rebirths.

When starting this 1100 mile commute between studios in Boston and Atlanta, I envisioned a kind of James Bond character with a dark suit and black attaché hopping on and off jets. It's ended up more like the Joad family in "Grapes of Wrath". The old truck with a mattress strapped on.

So, over a few days, I drive along the East Coast with my Toyota brimming with camera gear and supplies. The only stops I make are scheduled because the trip's just too long for meandering. 

  • Because you shoot at night you must have a lot of long exposures. What is the average night exposure you use? Do you remember what your longest exposure has been so far? 

PJ: Now that CMOS sensors are creeping toward a million ISO, digital photography is able to capture night images that we couldn't even imagine before.

Still, a mechanical camera can take eight-hour exposures, even in sub-zero weather. This is useful to record long-term transitions within a scene.

The moon and stars become arcs of light, bodies of water look like sheets of ice and a crowded plaza becomes a de-populated mist.

These visual aspects of long exposures complement the hard-edge linearity of the architecture and industry in my current series.

If it's windy, or even breezy, don't bother with analog night photography. Always using a tripod, I don't touch the camera while the lens is open. Even a cable-release transmits too much hand-vibration for critical detail. Instead, I block the light with an eight-inch card covered with black velvet. I open the lens, let the camera vibrations settle down and simply lift the card up and down for an exposure. Exactly like they did before shutters were introduced in the 1800's.

If there's time, it's best to set up before dusk and photograph the progression into full night. You want to catch the few minutes when the artificial light balances with the fading sunset to retain detail in the shadows.

Cities are not always that dark, especially when they're soft-lit by a glowing low-cloud canopy. Nevertheless, most nocturnal light levels don't even register on meters and film sensitivity drops off with longer exposures, so I estimate the luminance, based on previous sessions, and take a series of exposures, bracketing them in one-stop increments.

A typical set of exposures of an urban night scene might be 5 seconds through 8 minutes at f16, using Ilford Delta 100 film. So that would be: 5s,10s, 20s, 40s,1m, 2m, 4m and 8m. I finish the twelve-frame roll with best-guess exposures. Slightly over-exposed negs scan better than underexposed ones.

When staying at a hotel, I'll ask for a room with an upper-floor balcony, then check out the conditions for an extra-long urban night shot.

When it's gotten truly dark, I set the aperture at F 22–32, open the lens and set the iPhone's alarm for 6-8 hours; before the first light. When nothing goes wrong, there's been some surprisingly good results, especially in under-lit in cities.

  • Lets chat about the darkroom – how has your process changed throughout the years? Do you find it more difficult to work in film today versus when you started?

PJ: Film photography splits into two basic activities. First, you venture out to great locations and have adventures capturing the images.

Next, you seal yourself off in a claustrophobic black room with trays of smelly chemicals, turn out the lights and work there for days.

But, all those adventures are resurrected in your mind as you're creating the prints. The quiet darkroom intensifies the concentration needed to re-imagine those moments. This helps to create a print that pulls the viewer back into the original experience and makes them glad they visited.

Since your trying to transpose a real event into a flat b&w image, you've got to dip into the darkroom box-of-tricks for help. I try to get as vivid as print as possible without it seeming contrived or over-cooked. If the technique is evident, it's failed.

My darkroom methods have changed dramatically in the last 10 years, thanks in part, to the services of Panopticon.

The Panopticon team develop my negatives. Although it's a more technical than creative part photography, a properly developed negative is essential to the final print's success. Now I have beautifully developed medium-format negatives that I scan as huge 16-bit linear files, equivalent to a 500 megapixel capture.

Next, I process the scan in Photoshop and send the file back to Panopticon, who use their miraculous LVT (light valve technology) device and burn a 4x5 negative of the image. They also output any prints that are too large for my 20 x 24" darkroom trays.

The 4x5's are a dream to print in the darkroom. They still need some burning-in on the corners and edges (enlarger light drop-off)), but it's the same exposure for every negative. This way I have the versatility of Photoshop processing and the beauty of a selenium-toned gelatin-silver print.

  • What is it about a scene that makes you want to stop and take a photograph? 

PJ: Wolfgang Tillmans said, "If anything's worth photographing, then everything's worth photographing".

Well, sure, but my gallerist says, "You can photograph any crazy thing you want, but I choose what goes on the gallery's walls."  So I try to work within that polarity.

The "Photo Alert!" light is always blinking "Stand By" in the back of my brain. Just when you feel that your best work is behind you, suddenly there's a vista that takes your breath away. Or, more likely, you catch something out of the corner of your eye and go back for a second look. Then, while in heightened photographer mode, the more nuanced opportunities are spotted.

I often approach a scene by taking digital shots to experiment with lens lengths, frame lines and positions before breaking out the film camera. That also produces a light reading, timestamp and GPS coordinates for later. Next, I imagine the optimum light and weather conditions for the subject, even the dreaded "first light of dawn" option.

Also, considering the content of my work, I balance how dangerous or illegal my being there is against the promise of the image. Some subjects have been so compelling that I've accepted pretty high risks, like being held for questioning. Still, it's easier to apologize than get permission, which you never get. Helpful hint: Never photograph the military.

Now, later in my career, I have to push back against déjà vu's that say I've taken similar shots before. I probably have, but the current one might be an upgrade.

If all systems are go, I set up and begin trying to get a definitive shot. Don't count on coming back or that conditions won't change. Woody Allen may have said, "80% of success is just showing up", but "seizing the moment" is the other 20%.     

  • What are some tips/advice you would give to someone just starting out in photography?

PJ: At this point, seems like everyone's already started out in photography. We're in the midst of a technological revolution that we can't fully grasp.

It's a shock to see the century-old giant Nikon reeling from loss of sales to smart phones that didn't even exist 10 years ago.

The iPhone's easy to use and already in your pocket. You can send your creations immediately to Facebook, Instagram and YouTube, then sit back and wait for the "likes" to start cascading in.

If you have a poetical vision, why can't a smart phone serve your needs?  It's quite possible to shoot a feature for Vogue with an iPhone, but the looks you'd get from the art director, stylist and models might be wilting.

Now, more photographs are taken each day than in the first fifty years of photography. But there are qualitative differences, like there is between the Gettysburg address and a grocery list.

The basic questions remain, like for a start: What do you choose to put in front of the lens and how do you interpret its image? Is the photograph telling the story you want it to?  Do variouscomponents support or contradict this message? The list goes on. Some of it's intuitive, but mostly it's a craft that requires training.

The serious photography student is fortunate to have excellent schools in Boston. The New England School of Photography and Mass College of Art are both good places to study. NESOP has courses in commercial photography and MassArt a great fine-art department, although neither are limited to just that.  After some experience, assisting professionals on the job is a crash-course field and studio techniques.

When you feel ready, sign up for portfolio reviews. Get as many crits as possible and if certain observations keep coming up, it's kind of a litmus test.

For me, photography is the key way to connect to life first hand, rather than through the interpretation of others. It's also given me the impetus and license to explore everywhere. That's why I try hard to make my photographs worth seeing. 

 

Artist Spotlight: Margaret Lampert

We have had the pleasure of working with photographer Margaret Lampert for the past ten years. Margaret’s work perfectly combines commercial and artistic photography. Her ability to capture authentic moments matched with her use of lighting and compositions creates images that are unique to her style. Margaret’s work ranges from individual and family portrait sessions to big companies like Target, Crayola, and Clorox.

  • What first drew you to photographing people?

ML: Initially what drew me to photographing people was making eye contact with my subjects. There was something about that experience of connecting so directly that I found completely thrilling. As the years have passed I feel less of a need to have my subjects look into the lens. Now their attention can really be anywhere as long as I feel I’ve found an authentic moment with them.

  • What do you think makes a memorable photograph?

ML: Photographs that are layered both visually and emotionally always stay with me. I think an image is memorable when it changes and/or challenges the way I see and shows me (or makes me feel) something in a different light.

  • When you go on a shoot what equipment do you usually bring? About how many images do you take of each person or family?

ML: When I’m shooting personal work my equipment is very basic. Usually just one body and one or two lenses. Until a few years ago I always shot medium format film for my personal work but have since transitioned to digital. For commercial assignments the equipment is completely tailored to the job at hand.

  • What is the most challenging thing about photographing people?

ML:  I think the most challenging aspect of photographing people is getting past their discomfort with being in front of the lens and identifying and capturing a moment when they are completely themselves.  In some cases, particularly with people who find themselves in front of the camera on a regular basis (well known people and teenage girls : )) it’s more a matter of getting past their well practiced pose and finding an authentic moment with my subject.

  • You work a lot with children and families, is there a secret to getting the perfect image? How do you make the clients feel relaxed in front of your camera?

ML: I think if you are patient enough eventually people become less focused (no pun intended) on the camera and the perfect moment unfolds.

  • When did you start working in advertising? Do you have a most memorable assignment you have done?

ML: I began working in advertising around 2001. One of the most memorable projects was a station domination campaign I did for Clorox. We captured all the images in one day in a park in LA and they ran as installations in railway stations all across the country. The way they were installed was very compelling in that there was no copy on the images themselves. People walked through the station initially not understanding why the images were there; it seemed just to be an exhibit of photographs. Off to the side of each image there was an illuminated Clorox logo and mention of the product.

What made this project so memorable was that I was hired for all the right reasons ie the creative director saw a certain quality in my work that was perfectly suited to the intention of the campaign. When this happens the collaboration is always a joy and the resulting images reflect that experience.

  • You recently made a portfolio book to showcase your photographs. Can you tell us your experience with creating the book?

ML: It’s still very important to have a printed portfolio when working in advertising. Even though almost everyone is introduced to your work online to experience the images properly printed and showcased adds a whole new dimension to a prospective client’s impression of your work.

Working with Panopticon on the recent portfolios (as well as the ones that came before) has made a difficult and daunting process about as seamless as it gets. From customer service to printing they are always a joy to work with and interpret the images perfectly. They take my work as seriously as I do and their passion for photography is always evident in the quality of whatever they produce.

  • What is the best piece of advice you’ve been given?

ML: Hmmm…that’s a tough one…can I get back to you on that?